Booker T has been in wrestling a long time. He started out as a tag team specialist with his brother Stevie Ray in WCW and won tag team gold. Then Booker became a stand-out singles star and World Heavyweight Champion in both WCW and WWE. He now is a commentator on Monday Night Raw, and in my opinion, does a great job.

But, for all his accolades, Booker T is infamous for a controversial slip of the tongue that is over 20 years old. While cutting a promo on Hulk Hogan, Booker T let out a horrible racial slur.

The moment has become infamous in and out of wrestling and was parodied in the ring by the New Day and other wrestlers.

Following the segment on Smackdown and the controversial segment where the same word was mentioned by the Ball Family on Monday Night Raw, Booker took to his podcast to explain his side of the story and how he feels about the moment and the word.

Via NoDQ:

“Me personally, I don’t appreciate it. I don’t know if [WWE] knew that the parody was gonna go down because I know those guys do a lot of their own stuff. I don’t think that we as a company need to go that route. I think that parody should not have ever been shown on television because it wasn’t a great moment for us as black people. For us as black people, it was one of our worst moments, just like the Ball thing. The kid is 15-years old, I don’t blame him or anything like that. It was something that slipped out just like myself, it was something that slipped out. For me as a person that’s trying to set an example for us as black people and for me to let so many people down; even the ones that thought it was the cool; even the ones that thought it was an anthem. I want them to know that it was my worst day that I could have ever had being a black man and letting so many of our people down by calling us that word or saying that word in any realm, any form, was definitely not right by any means. I wish I could take it right back. That one blemish is the only thing they have over my head that they could put out there to try to make me look bad in any way shape, form, or fashion. Of course, I could put a spin on it, but does that make it right? No, it doesn’t make it right. It’s still a stain, a blemish, a mark that no surgical procedure could ever repair. So I just want young people to“Me personally, I don’t appreciate it. I don’t know if [WWE] knew that the parody was gonna go down because I know those guys do a lot of their own stuff. I don’t think that we as a company need to go that route. I think that parody should not have ever been shown on television because it wasn’t a great moment for us as black people. For us as black people, it was one of our worst moments, just like the Ball thing. The kid is 15-years old, I don’t blame him or anything like that. It was something that slipped out just like myself, it was something that slipped out. For me as a person that’s trying to set an example for us as black people and for me to let so many people down; even the ones that thought it was the cool; even the ones that thought it was an anthem. I want them to know that it was my worst day that I could have ever had being a black man and letting so many of our people down by calling us that word or saying that word in any realm, any form, was definitely not right by any means. I wish I could take it right back. That one blemish is the only thing they have over my head that they could put out there to try to make me look bad in any way shape, form, or fashion. Of course, I could put a spin on it, but does that make it right? No, it doesn’t make it right. It’s still a stain, a blemish, a mark that no surgical procedure could ever repair.”

I agree with Booker here. The word has a horrible history and is damaging to society and those who hear it. I’m sure New Day and others thought they were paying tribute to Booker T, but really they’re just digging up a moment he wishes had never ever happened. I’m glad Booker spoke up on this issue. It can’t have been easy. He’s a respected veteran in wrestling and I am sure the young guys will listen to him.

Racism was a big part of wrestling in the past, and even still today good guys and bad guys are often based on foreigners vs. fellow citizens. This isn’t just in WWE. Even in Japan, the top heels are often American or other foreigners who come in to rough up the local talent. Good vs. Evil can be played out without resorting to racism or xenophobia.

Booker understands this, let’s hope younger wrestlers understand the sacrifice and the words of wisdom from the 5x(five time, five time) champion.

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